3eVTxL - HIV tests for new GP patients 'can aid early diagnosis' General 

HIV tests for new GP patients 'can aid early diagnosis'

HIV tests for new GP patients ‘can aid early diagnosis’ Offering HIV testing when people register with a new GP in areas of high prevalence is cost-effective and could prolong lives, a new study says. Patients at 40 GP surgeries in the London borough of Hackney were given finger-prick HIV testing when registering. The study, in the Lancet, found this raised the rate of diagnosis four-fold. The Terrence Higgins Trust welcomed the findings and called on healthcare commissioners to act on them. Public Health England already recommends that all GPs…

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dD1clZ - Mental health staff recruitment plan for England General 

Mental health staff recruitment plan for England

Mental health staff recruitment plan for England Thousands more mental health workers are to be recruited by the NHS in England, the health secretary has said. Jeremy Hunt said it was time to end the “historic imbalance” between mental and physical health services. The aim is to recruit enough nurses, therapists and consultants to treat an extra one million patients by 2020-21. But the Royal College of Nursing said the plans did not add up, and more “hard cash” would be needed if the new staff were to be trained…

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fjOnrC - Alpha-gal allergy: What you need to know Allergies 

Alpha-gal allergy: What you need to know

Alpha-gal allergy: What you need to know An alpha-gal allergy is often discovered after eating red meat. Alpha-gal allergy is a condition more commonly known as red meat allergy. An alpha-gal allergy can cause a person to have anaphylactic and hypersensitivity reactions when they eat meat.The term alpha-gal is short for galactose-alpha-1, 3-galactose, a carbohydrate molecule that can cause an allergic reaction in people with an alpha-gal allergy. The molecule is found in the meat of mammals, including cows, sheep, venison, bison, and pigs. Alpha-gal allergy is chiefly spread by…

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FYadK9 - Health regulator to investigate care home rape cover-up claims General 

Health regulator to investigate care home rape cover-up claims

Health regulator to investigate care home rape cover-up claims The body which regulates health and social care in England admits it could have acted more quickly after a rape was reported at a home for people with learning disabilities in north London. The rape is alleged to have happened in November 2015 and the home closed a year later. An article in the Times on Thursday accused the Care Quality Commission of a cover-up. The CQC says it will now investigate what should have been done differently. The regulator said…

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GzuUuy - Charlie Gard parents announce death of 'beautiful boy' General 

Charlie Gard parents announce death of 'beautiful boy'

Charlie Gard parents announce death of ‘beautiful boy’ Media playback is unsupported on your device Charlie Gard, the baby at the centre of a legal row over his treatment, has died, a family spokesman has confirmed. The 11-month-old was moved to a hospice following a High Court ruling. He suffered from an extremely rare genetic condition causing progressive brain damage and muscle weakness. His parents, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, fought a lengthy legal battle with Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to allow him to be taken to the US…

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Kx1qte - Slimy slugs inspire 'potentially lifesaving' medical glue General 

Slimy slugs inspire ‘potentially lifesaving’ medical glue

Slimy slugs inspire ‘potentially lifesaving’ medical glue A defensive mucus secreted by slugs has inspired a new kind of adhesive that could transform medicine, say scientists. The “bio-glue” is incredibly strong, moves with the body and crucially, sticks to wet surfaces. The team at Harvard University have even used it to seal a hole in a pig’s heart. Experts have described the glue as “really cool” and said there would be “absolutely huge demand” for it. Getting something to stick to a damp surface has been a huge challenge –…

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UPJDTT - Drinking a few times a week 'reduces diabetes risk' General 

Drinking a few times a week 'reduces diabetes risk'

Drinking a few times a week ‘reduces diabetes risk’ People who drink three to four times a week are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who never drink, Danish researchers suggest. Wine appears to be particularly beneficial, probably as it plays a role in helping to manage blood sugar, the study, published in Diabetologia, says. They surveyed more than 70,000 people on their alcohol intake – how much and how often they drank. But experts said this wasn’t a “green light” to drink more than recommended. And…

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XibZnf - Mental health crisis services in England 'under pressure' General 

Mental health crisis services in England 'under pressure'

Mental health crisis services in England ‘under pressure’ Media playback is unsupported on your device Services for people who are suicidal or self-harming are facing unprecedented demand in England, a BBC Radio 5 live investigation has found. Out of 39 mental health trusts that provided figures for their crisis teams, 27 had seen their workload increase – 70%. And some had seen referrals rise by as much as 60% – but without a comparable rise in funding. NHS England said an extra £400m would be spent on crisis resolution teams….

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O6rhvp - Should you finish a course of antibiotics? General 

Should you finish a course of antibiotics?

Should you finish a course of antibiotics? It is time to reconsider the widespread advice that people should always complete an entire course of antibiotics, experts in the BMJ say. They argue there is not enough evidence to back the idea that stopping pills early encourages antibiotic resistance. Instead, they suggest, more studies need to be done to see if stopping once feeling better can help cut antibiotic use. But GPs urge people not to change their behaviour in the face of one study. Prof Helen Stokes-Lampard, leader of the…

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7XRqjv - Sperm count drop 'could make humans extinct' General 

Sperm count drop 'could make humans extinct'

Sperm count drop ‘could make humans extinct’ Humans could become extinct if sperm counts in men continue to fall at current rates, a doctor has warned. Researchers assessing the results of nearly 200 studies say sperm counts among men from North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, seem to have halved in less than 40 years. Some experts are sceptical of the Human Reproduction Update findings. But lead researcher Dr Hagai Levine said he was “very worried” about what might happen in the future. The assessment, one of the largest…

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